The accounting information systems (AIS) field is undergoing expansive changes, both professionally and academically. The AIS sections of the American Accounting Association (AAA) have grown, jointly enrolling close to 900 members and publishing two journals. The field has at least four other journals being published,1 with others emerging. Research areas once traditionally part of the AIS domain (Brown, Wong, and Baldwin 2007; Chiu, Liu, and Vasarhelyi 2014) are progressively overlapping with more traditional literatures. For example, financial accounting research, especially market research, has expanded the usage of text mining (Berry 2004); traditional auditing literature has begun to address continuous auditing (Vasarhelyi and Halper 1991; Alles, Kogan, and Vasarhelyi 2004); managerial accounting literature has discussed ERP (enterprise resource planning) systems (Kuhn and Sutton 2010; O'Leary 2009); and fraud literature has discussed the use of such tools as data mining...

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