ABSTRACT: Prior to training about the principles of proper graph design, effort‐inducing interventions (warning decision makers about the possibility that graphs create misleading impressions and/or requiring them to write a brief justification of their choices) reduced the decision‐biasing effects of misleadingly designed graphs, but only for decision makers with prior task experience. In contrast, a 30‐minute training session on the principles of graph design improved decision quality for all participants, regardless of prior task experience. Moreover, after the training, neither type of effort‐inducing intervention affected the decision quality of experienced decision makers. These results suggest that the best way to counteract the decision‐biasing effects of misleadingly designed graphs is to educate decision makers about the principles of proper graph design. Our results, however, indicate that such training does not totally eliminate the decision‐biasing effects of misleadingly designed graphs. Therefore, organizations also need to take steps to prevent the creation and dissemination of misleadingly designed graphs.

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